February 13, 2021 2 minutes to read Source / Disclosures Published by: Disclosures: Elkind and Slawin do not report any relevant financial disclosures. ADD A SUBJECT TO E-MAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are posted on Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articlesRead More →

More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive to adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults suffer from a chronic illness that lasts a lifetime and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has published advice on howRead More →

Originally posted on the blog of Union of concerned scientists.through Taryn MacKinney, Researcher investigator When Scientists from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concluded that chemical trichlorethylene (TCE) causes fetal heart defects, even at low doses, White House officials say exceeded their conclusions – a blatant example of political interference inRead More →

Mothers living near more intense oil and gas developmental activities are 40-70% more likely to have children with congenital heart defects, according to a new study by researchers at the Colorado School (CHD ) than those living in areas of less intense activity. of Public Health. “We observed that moreRead More →

© iStock/wildpixel Health Europa presents recent research on the long-term effects of congenital heart defects on infants and their mothers. Congenital heart defects – which include Ebstein’s anomaly, aortic valve stenosis and tricuspid atresia – are the most common birth conditions and affect around 1% of all newborn babies. Fortunately,Read More →

(HealthDay)—People with adult-onset congenital heart disease of lesser complexity have a higher burden of adverse cardiovascular events than the general population, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published Feb. 28 in Traffic. Priyanka Saha of Stanford University School of Medicine in California and colleagues attempted toRead More →

The most common birth defects are congenital heart defects (CHD). These abnormalities occur when there is an inability of the heart or its major blood vessels to form properly during embryonic and/or fetal growth and development. They can range from simple holes in the cardiac septum, or narrow valves, toRead More →

Rising temperatures resulting from global climate change could increase the number of infants born with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in the United States over the next two decades and could result in up to 7,000 additional cases over an 11-year period in eight representative states (Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa, NorthRead More →